Jose Manuel Álvarez Martínez

Investigador

alvarezjm@unican.es

+34 942 20 16 16 Ext.1121

Biography

PhD in Ecology and Environmental Technology from the University of León, with mention “Doctor Europeus” Cum Laude. Postdoc researcher in Environmental Hydraulics Institute ‘IHCantabria’ of the Universidad de Cantabria (Santander, Spain) and formerly at National Museum of Natural Sciences (CSIC) in Madrid, Spain.

His main research topics are related to the effect of land use and cover change on vegetation dynamics and function (Landscape Ecology). He is particularly focused on large-scale biodiversity monitoring, species/community distribution modelling using remote sensing and advanced spatial statistics.

He has a large experience on the evaluation of the ecological consequences of anthropic land use (and their underlying mechanisms) on ecosystem functioning and services provided to human societies, with particular interest on the effects of forest dynamics in soil and hydrological properties across environmental gradients.

Has done several stages at outstanding national and international Research Centers as the University of Wageningen (The Netherlands), CREAF the Autonomous University of Barcelona (Spain) and Doñana Biological Station (CSIC, Spain). Teaching experience, coordination of research works and speaker at numerous courses, masters, conferences and technical sessions related to new technologies applied to ecological and environmental studies. Participation in research projects at the EU and national levels with the Universidad de Cantabria, León, CSIC, and other public and private authorities. Author of book chapters, many technical documents and more than 15 scientific papers published and indexed in the SCI.

RESEARCH LINES

Spatial analysis and evaluation of ecological niche and species distributions;
Habitat mapping of large territories at various spatiotemporal scales;
Estimation of anthropic disturbances and land use change on vegetation and soil properties;
Evaluation of ecosystem services provided by forest systems to society.

PUBLICATIONS

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